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It is pretty Basic but I believe correct. I want to thank robinlsb over at LGT.com for the work.

Some nice stuff from various sites.





Suspension Geometry



Toe in

Toe is the angle (inwards or outwards) that the tires point when the wheel is straight ahead. Toe-in means the front of the tires point inward, and toe-out means they point outward. Zero toe means the tires are parallel to each other. The biggest effect toe has on the handling of the car is on stability. When a car hits a bump or enters a corner, forces on the tires act to steer the car off to one side, making the car unstable and difficult to control. Toe-in counteracts this, improving stability. Toe-in also causes understeer during initial corner entry. Interestingly, toe on the rear wheels has the same effect on handling as toe on the front. Toe on the rear wheels is useful for tuning the handling of the car as it is exiting corners.

Front Toe "IN"
Slower steering response
More straight-line stability
Too much will cause greater wear at the outboard edges of the tires

Front Zero Toe
Medium steering response
Minimum power loss
Minimum tire wear

Front Toe "OUT"
Quicker steering response
Less straight-line stability
Too much will cause greater wear at the inboard edges of the tires

Less Rear Toe "IN"
Less straight-line stability
Less traction out of the corner
More steering
Higher top speed

Intermediate Rear Toe "IN"
Intermediate straight-line stability
Intermediate traction out of the corner
Intermediate steering
Intermediate top speed

More Rear Toe "IN"
More straight-line stability
More traction out of the corner
Less steering
Less top speed

****

Caster
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Caster is the angle to which the steering pivot axis is tilted forward or rearward from vertical, as viewed from the side. If the pivot axis is tilted backward (that is, the top pivot is positioned farther rearward than the bottom pivot), then the caster is positive; if it's vertical to the lower pivot point then the caster is zero.

Less Castor (vertical = 0 castor)
More OFF POWER steering into the corner
Less steering out of the corner
Less straight-line stability

More Caster (laid back more)
Less steering into the corner
More ON POWER steering out of the corner
More straight-line stability

Benefits of castor: (more positive castor/laid back more)

Maximizes tire contact patch during roll, braking, and acceleration
Improves turn-in response
Increase directional stability
Improved steering "feel" and self-center
Increases dynamic negative camber during turn in

Castor Vs Camber:

Camber doesn’t improve turn-in, positive caster does.
Camber is not good for tire wear.
Camber doesn’t improve directional stability.
Camber adversely effects braking and acceleration.

****

Shock Absorbers
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The purpose of the shock absorbers is to dampen the oscillation of the springs. The dampers not only dampen spring oscillations, but they also affect handling during transient conditions (such as the entry and exit of turns), but not steady-state conditions.

More Dampening
Slower shock action = could be unstable on bumpy tracks
Slower chassis weight transfer
Generally less traction

Less Dampening
Faster shock action = less chance of tire leaving the ground on bumpy tracks
Faster chassis weight transfer
Generally more traction

****

Springs
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The purpose of the springs is to control wheel movement and keep the tire in contact with the road over bumps and irregularities. Stiffening the springs front and rear will reduce body roll and make handling more responsive, but cause a loss of traction over bumpy surfaces. Likewise, softening all of the springs will give more grip on bumpy tracks, but increase roll and reduce responsiveness. You can also use the springs to affect the car balance. You can reduce oversteer by stiffening the front springs or softening the rear. Likewise, you can reduce understeer by softening the front springs or stiffening the rear. However, be advised that changing just one end also affects fore/aft weight transfer. By softening the front springs, you'll also get more dive under braking. Softening the rear will give you more rear weight transfer under acceleration, which can give you more traction on the rear wheels in straight-line acceleration. Read and understand about "anti-roll bars" before you come to the conclusion that you need to change your springs, springs should be one of the last, if not the last thing you should change to effect how the car handles other than during a bump condition.

Using Softer Front Springs
More steering
Slower steering response
Used on bumpy tracks
More 'diving' under braking
Used more for tight technical tracks

Using Harder Front Springs
Less steering
Faster steering response
Used on flat tracks
Minimum 'diving' under braking
Used more for large fast tracks

Using Softer Rear Springs
More traction out of the corner
Slower steering response
Used on bumpy tracks
More front lift under acceleration
Used more for tight technical tracks

Using Harder Rear Springs
Less traction out of the corner
Faster steering response
Used on flat tracks
Minimum front lift under acceleration
Used more for large fast tracks

****
Front Anti-roll Bar
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The front anti-roll bar affects the amount the car’s front end rolls in a turn. As a car enters a turn, centrifugal cornering forces cause car roll and weight-transfer to the side of the car on the outside of the turn. A very stiff front anti-roll bar increases the load on the outside front tire, and decreases the load on the inside front tire (it can help to note that a stiff bar will tend to raise the inside front tire, thereby lowering that tire’s load). At the same time, this stiff front anti-roll bar increases the load on the inside rear tire, and decreases load on the outside rear tire. In this situation, the balance of side traction between front and rear ends shifts to the rear, and you get a car with a lower amount of steering, but more steering responsiveness.

Don’t get confused between amount of steering and steering responsiveness; a car with a soft front anti-roll bar can have a high amount of steering, but it takes more time for the chassis to roll and transfer weight with this soft anti-roll bar and this creates slow steering responsiveness. A stiff front anti-roll bar will create very quick car weight transfer and thus very fast steering responsiveness, but with a lower amount of steering. In other words, amount of steering refers to how much steering ability the car has; steering responsiveness refers to the speed or quickness of the car’s steering ability.


Softer Anti-roll bar setting
More steering into corner
More steering in the corner
Slower steering response

Harder Anti-roll bar setting
Less steering into corner
Less steering in the corner
Faster steering response

****

Rear Anti-roll Bar
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The rear anti-roll bar affects the amount the car’s rear end rolls in a turn. As a car enters a turn, centrifugal cornering forces cause car roll and weight transfer to the side of the car on the outside of the turn. A stiff rear anti-roll bar increases the load on the outside rear tire, and decreases the load on the inside rear tire (it can help to note that a stiff bar will tend to raise the inside rear tire, thereby lowering that tire’s load). At the same time, this stiff rear anti-roll bar increases the load on the inside front tire, and decreases the load on the outside front tire. In this situation, the balance of side traction between front and rear ends shifts to the front, and you get a car with less rear traction, but more steering responsiveness (refer to the Front Anti-Roll bar page for more explanation on steering responsiveness). The opposite happens with a soft rear anti-roll bar: relative to the stiff setting, there is now less load on the outside rear tire and more load on the inside rear tire. The front inside tire also has less load, and the outside front gets more load. Now, the balance of side traction shifts to the rear, creating more rear side traction in the corner, but less steering responsiveness.


Softer Anti-roll bar setting More side traction in the corner
More traction out of the corner
Slower steering response

Harder Anti-roll bar setting Less side traction in the corner
Less traction out of the corner
Faster steering response

****
Camber
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( PLEASE READ ABOUT CASTOR BEFORE YOU ADJUST YOUR CAMBER )

Camber is the angle the tires make with the road and is measured in degrees. Tire grip varies with the camber angle, and ideally is maximum when the angle is zero. However, the maximum grip is found with a small amount of negative camber because of tire sidewall deflection (when the top of the tire is tilted inward it is called negative camber. Also, as the body rolls in a turn, the suspension movements themselves causes some adverse camber change. These combined effects mean that for maximum cornering power you need to have some amount of negative camber. However, too much camber will cause you to lose grip because the outside edge of the tire is being lifted off of the pavement, reducing the contact patch. So to summarize, as the camber angle increases from zero, cornering grip improves to a point, then falls off.

-2 deg. ~ -1 deg.
Front Camber
Quicker steering response
More overall side traction
Less chance of traction rolling

-1 deg. ~ 0 deg.
Front Camber
Less quick steering response
Less overall side traction
More chance of traction rolling

-2 deg. ~ -1 deg.
Rear Camber More overall side traction
More traction under braking
Less chance of traction rolling

-1 deg. ~ 0 deg.
Rear Camber Less overall side traction
Less traction under breaking
More chance of traction rolling




Ride Height
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A lower ride height lowers the center of gravity, which reduces weight transfer during cornering, acceleration, and braking. The reduced weight transfer improves cornering. A lower ride height also lowers drag at high speed because you are presenting a smaller frontal profile to the airstream. Also, by lowering the front end and raising the rear, you can improve high speed stability and increase downforce by preventing high-pressure air from building up underneath the nose of the car. If the car is too low, it can bottom out, though this can be eliminated by stiffening the springs (which could cause problems elsewhere).
 
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