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Has anyone tasked themselves with changing out the spark plugs yet? I'll be damned if there isn't some sort of flat plastic piping directly over the drivers side coilpacks. Not sure what the piping carries (air, coolant, kryptonite?) I just took a quick look but it doesn't look like an easy job. Anyone tackled this yet?
 

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There's on one IWSTI...really isn't hard, just time consuming. You will have to move the tube that comes off the air pump. Make sure to keep track of the coil pack plugs. Black one is the rear and the gray/white one is the front.
 

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I did mine from underneath, didn't remove anything but the lower splash shield. Took maybe 35 40 minutes. Once you get the lower splash shield down unplug all the coils and remove the coil hold down bolts. 10mm I think. The hardest part is the drivers side front coil. It's pretty tight but the boot is flexible so eventually it comes out.

I replaced mine with denso iridiums then yanked them again and regapped them. Getting them from underneath is the way to go imop!
 

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Yea i agree with you man! I followed a legacy gt guide and it took me almost 4 hours. On the drivers rear plug i finally decided to get under the car and i was kicking myself for not doing that right away.
 

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Just thought I'd throw my two cents in, but I just did this today on my 08 wrx. Quite honestly, it completely and utterly SUCKS! I won't sugar coat it. I'll admit I am a slow worker, but I like to think I am moderately mechanically inclined, and it still took me just over 4.5 hours from start to finish!!

The guide that was previously mentioned on iwsti was a great help to get a boiler plate for what's to come. I'd like to add some tips after actually doing it however. To start, I can't see doing this job on my back from underneath the engine and having it be any faster or easier than the way I did it...just throwing that out there.

Next, the driver's side coil pack, closest to the firewall was the most difficult, and of course, the one I started with. All the rest are easier - that's the good news. I found the best way at getting the plug out was to use the 5/8" spark plug socket, then connect a universal/wobble/flexible socket to that, then connect a 3" extension, and then like a 6-8" extension in that order. If you try to have them all connected at one time, then try to stick it in the engine it won't fit! Also as mentioned in the guide, for this coil pack, you do have to spin it around a number of different ways before you can pry it out as there is just so little clearance. I think I did turn it 180* or so before it did come out.

Also, to initially unscrew the bolts holding the coil packs in, I used a tiny ratcheting wrench that I found at Home Depot that comes with screwdriver bits, as well as an adapter for 1/4" sockets. It is maybe 1/4" thick and about 4 or 5 inches long. I think it was a Husky brand. This tool proved invaluable at unscrewing those bolts as there is not enough clearance to use a normal size ratcheting wrench and have enough room to back the bolt out.

On the driver's side: I did remove the entire battery and all related components. For the air pump, which is connected to that weird black plastic "flattened tube", I unscrewed the bolt that holds the air pump in place as it gave me some wiggle room to pull off the plastic tube as mentioned in the iwsti guide. This bolt is the one that threads through a fat rubber spacer. To allow the plastic tube to rotate up and out of the way, there is a bolt threaded through a bracket that holds the tube in place that I removed. Said bracket is located directly underneath the black, flattened tube. Now you'll have much better access to the coil packs.

On the passenger's side: I removed the entire airbox as well as the elbow intake tube and snorkel. I believe this is shown in the aforementioned guide as well. Just an fyi, there are two bolts that hold down the airbox, one near the back of the headlight and one on the bottom of the airbox on the right side. I had to undo the clips, pull out the filter and pull the airbox out in two separate pieces to finagle the dang thing out! It wouldn't come out as one unit. Oh, and of course unplug the wire at the top of the airbox as well.

To install the new plugs: I inserted the plug into the socket, attached the wobble socket to that, then started to finger tighten the plug as best I could into the engine to get it started before attaching all the other extensions. Otherwise I would screw and screw and the plug wouldn't even be seated correctly and wouldn't begin to thread!!

As you are removing various parts, keep track of all the nuts and bolts as there will be A LOT of them. With the setup of extensions I listed I was able to use my torque wrench set at 15 ftlbs to torque down the spark plugs. If you use anti seize remember you only need to torque them down to about 10 ftlbs!! (The NGK Iridiums I bought did not need it.)

Other tools I recommend having on hand are a long, thin "grabber tool" that you can grab dropped parts or bolts with. I also used the long, extendable, magnetic tool picker upper thing as well for a few dropped bolts in the engine bay.

That's it. I think these tips in addition to the how-to guide on iwsti should be able to successfully instruct any would-be mechanic on installing spark plugs. Good luck and set a few hours aside to get this done :)
 

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I did mine yesterday on my 2011 WRX. I flashed my car with the Torqued Performance stage 3 map a week or two ago and new one step colder plugs were recommended. I watched a "how to" video on youtube first. It wasn't WRX specific but it worked. I removed the battery first and mine had the flat black tube over the drivers side plugs coming from the air pump(car in video didn't). I squeezed the clamp with pliers on the air pump but had trouble getting the tube off the pump. I ended up taking out the two 10 or 12mm bolts that mount the pump to wiggle it around to get the tube to disconnect. I left the other side of the tube connected because it seemed nearly impossible to access. The rear drivers plug was the most difficult to do but wasn't super tough. I used a spark plug socket with a three inch long 3/8" extension on a 3/8" craftsman ratchet on all 4 plugs. The rear drivers was tight, I used a 90 degree pick tool to get the clip off then flipped the coil pack 180 degrees and wiggled it out. My passengers side was pretty easy because I already had an intake on, which only took a second to take off. I did all mine from the top and it took about an hour and a half to two hours. All in all, it wasn't as bad as I expected. If you don't let the limited space scare you and you have some time, it's nothing too difficult.
 
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