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Hey guys,

Does anyone know of any possible way to remove headlamp condensation without having to remove the entire headlamp housing? Removing the assembly would require first removing the bumper on my car, which would be a huge pain. I wish there was something I could do to the outside of the headlamp housing to cause the condensation to evaporate.

Thanks.
 

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Does anyone know of any possible way to remove headlamp condensation without having to remove the entire headlamp housing?
i do not, sorry.

Removing the assembly would require first removing the bumper on my car, which would be a huge pain.
+1 to what dai11est, said. maybe ten minutes, if that.

I wish there was something I could do to the outside of the headlamp housing to cause the condensation to evaporate.
i doubt there is anything that would work well that you can do without removal of bumper and headlamps. have you worked on them before (opened them up for mods or repair) or installed HIDs? you can either deal with it, or if it's really bad, the best and most comprehensive way to fix it would be open them up, let dry, and reseal with proper procedure and extra sealant and make sure there are no openings for moisture to enter.

g'luck!
 

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if you've opened them, re-sealing is the only option really.

if you haven't, take the car to the dealer and let them fix it.

I used a heatgun on the lens, making sure not to spend too much time on the lens as to melt it, and removed the low beam dust cap. it removed the condensation relatively quickly. that doesn't solve the problem though, and it will condense again if you don't fix the problem.
 

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It doesn't rain much in Vegas, but when it did all of last week, I'm noticing condensation and now a dried haze on the top portion of both headlights. The car is barely a year old so I'm bringing it to the dealer this weekend for them to either fix it or replace it so I don't have to. This kinda sucks since I noticed the same problem on my broinlaw's 2008 Impreza (the condensation went away after he replaced the OEM bulbs with IPF's that came with a thicker bulb rubber seal) -- must be a bad Subaru headlight/seal design.
 

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If you are getting condensation inside of the headlamp, first try to find the source of condensation. One thing could be bad O-rings around the headlamps, check those first and try to reposition the bulbs so they fit snug.

To remove the condensation simply get a hair dryer or a head gun (on LOW!), and then focus the warm air into the headlamp through where the bulbs go.
 

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Sorry to thread jack, but this is related -
Do any of you guys have what looks like very slight delamination on the inside of the headlight cover?
 

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If you are getting condensation inside of the headlamp, first try to find the source of condensation. One thing could be bad O-rings around the headlamps, check those first and try to reposition the bulbs so they fit snug.

To remove the condensation simply get a hair dryer or a head gun (on LOW!), and then focus the warm air into the headlamp through where the bulbs go.
I wouldn't recommend blowing into the headlight.

any dust or anything that has settled inside of the headlight will be blown airborne and will settle in the condensation on the lens and create spotting
 

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I had a slight condensation issue that happened a little while ago. Here is a good way to get rid of it:

Things you need:
-Calcium Sulfate (also known as Plaster of Paris or is used in making Tofu)
-Coffee filters
-Strong string
-Tape

Now, the calcium sulfate is a desiccant, and is used quite often in labs to keep water sensitive samples dry. I used some Drierite that we had in my lab, but if you don't have access to a chemistry lab, head to any hobby store and they will have Plaster of Paris which is the same stuff.

Take about 2-3 coffee filters and lay them on top of each other, you don't want any of the Calcium Sulfate to get out into the headlight. Pour a decent amount on there (think size of golf ball). Wrap it all up and tie it up at the top. Make sure you tie a very tight knot so that it doesn't come undone and tape around the top.

Take out your high beam bulb, and gently push the sack of calcium sulfate in while leaving the string hanging out. If the sack doesn't go in easily, remake it with less Calcium Sulfate, you want to be able to get this thing out lol.

Put your high beam bulb back in so that it seals the headlight back up. Let it sit like this over night. I did this two nights in a row, with fresh calcium sulfate and haven't had any condensation issues since. Make sure you take the sack back out thought before you fire up your headlights :)
 

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I'm not sure if it helps, but I live in Seattle with plenty of humidity and rain. I leave my headlights on whenever I drive, no matter how bright it is. None of my vehicles have had problems with condensation inside the housing....except for the one car with a hole on the lamp from a rock.
 

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Not meaning to bring an old thread back from the dead but anyone out there with non factory hid install an hid kit? I never had a problem with moisture before until lately and I've had no dust covers for about 2 years now. Would simply getting new dust caps, drilling a whole just big enough to feed the aftermarket his wires through, and then maybe using rtv to seal the gap between the cover and wires work? Or anyone have a better way?
 

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really? You haven't had the dust caps on for 2 years? I think that'll help a great deal. The dust caps have a rubber ring around the edges to help keep moisture out also along with dust. I think you'd help your condensation a lot by putting on those back on. I don't even think you'll need to put any sealer on the hole, the big rubber grommet should be enough. I would use to air to dry out the inside of your headlights first before sealing it up (I know stating the obvious) but yea I think you should be good with just that. I have a morimoto HID kit on my halogen headlights and haven't had issues with condensation, and we've gotten plenty of rain here in MD.
 

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Ya I'm surprised it even lasted that long. I live in ct and there's plenty of humidity year round too. I'm planning on doing the morimoto halos and painting the rest of the chrome out this summer. I just figured moisture would be able to get through any sized whole of the caps.
Thanks for the response makikogi
 

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I doubt there is anything that would work well that you can do without removal of bumper and headlamps. have you worked on them before (opened them up for mods or repair) or installed HIDs? you can either deal with it, or if it's really bad, the best and most comprehensive way to fix it would be open them up, let dry, and reseal with proper procedure and extra sealant and make sure there are no openings for moisture to enter.

g'luck!
The factory uses Butyl Rubber, you can pick it up from most windshield replacement facilities // When i do custom work on headlights I order butyl from
OCI Butyl Rubber Glue - Accessories

On the container - it literally says "windshield replacement kit"

Here are 2 photos of a customers headlights i did //


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