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so having never owned a new car yet, or anything with a turbo und such.,... what precautions should be taked with a new WRX besides the oil changes and all that "regular" maintinence stuff? ... i heard someone say not to cross 4K RPM until it has 1000km.. what else then? ... any other precautions or habits that are better for my car and prehaps its turbo and stuff?
 

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It won't hurt to let your car idle for a minute after driving. The break in period of 1000 miles is more for the turbo than it is for the engine. Check the oil a couple of times during the break in, just to assure you have no leaks. Heck, check everything for leaks including the tires. Once you start running it hard, again look for leaks. If something is going t fail it will probably happen in the first month or so after the break in. Once you feel comfortable...Drive like hell!
 

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i wait till the RPM idles below 1000 RPM (oil temp will be 55 deg celcius when that happens) before i drive.. i restrict myself to 3000 rpm until the oil temp reaches 80+deg celcius.. you may want to get some technical data from your engine company to find out whats the optimum operating temp to be sure if what i'm doing will fit your engine oil...
 

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i wait till the RPM idles below 1000 RPM (oil temp will be 55 deg celcius when that happens) before i drive.. i restrict myself to 3000 rpm until the oil temp reaches 80+deg celcius.. you may want to get some technical data from your engine company to find out whats the optimum operating temp to be sure if what i'm doing will fit your engine oil...
1000RPM? :eek: You must wait forever or live somewhere really warm...

I wait about 30 seconds (about 1500RPM) before scooting along.
 

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I don't wait for it to get all the way to 1000rpm, but I do control the rpms until it is fully warmed up.
 

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Well, it must be pretty muggy there too. I normally wait until the idle settles, normally right around 1.5k, it is a little bit colder now, so I am not going to wait for it drop down.... I don't got out and ride hard though until several minutes when it is warmed up.
 

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I read somewhere that the new WRX/STi have some alien technology where you don't need a turbo timer due to some sort of evaporation technique?...
 

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You don't need the turbo timer cause the turbos are water cooled, so they don't get as hot as the old oil cooled turbos. They are much better now, although they have always had watercooled turbos when they came out, it is just when they started putting them in passenger cars it was cheaper to use oil cooled turbos. This has caused too many problems over the years so they have moved back to the watercooled turbos.
 

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You don't need the turbo timer cause the turbos are water cooled, so they don't get as hot as the old oil cooled turbos. They are much better now, although they have always had watercooled turbos when they came out, it is just when they started putting them in passenger cars it was cheaper to use oil cooled turbos. This has caused too many problems over the years so they have moved back to the watercooled turbos.
THAT is good to know.

A friend of mine is an engine-building, metalworking demigod (former AMA pro mechanic), from the "lean on it a little bit" school of break-in, so I am, but I still watch the tacho to keep it under 4000rpm. I give it a bit of boot (half throttle or so) from time to time, give it a stretch to cool down a bit, boot it again, and so on. The main thing is to avoid constant engine speed (re: no highway droning), so that it will wear in evenly.

I start the car and drive gently until the engine warms up a bit, then I have a little more fun as both the car and I get into the zone. For a couple of minutes before parking it, I drive gently to try to keep it off-boost, to let the turbo cool down. Maybe that's not longer necessary? The last turbo car I had any experience with (the perfectly awful 1984 Dodge Daytona) had an oil-cooled turbo that would get hot enough to glow in the dark.

A pyrometer would be an interesting add-on, to check the temperature of the turbo under different driving conditions.
 
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